MNSBR: GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE - MNSBR

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GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE edited 08/25

#1 User is offline   Bear Icon

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 10:59 AM

GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE
Compiled & reconstructed by Bear

ON TIME
Show up early! If the group plans to meet at 2:00pm, plan to be there by 1:50pm. Besides, it will give you a chance to talk and b.s. with other riders.

GAS
Always get a full tank of gas before you show up for the group ride. The group will not appreciate having to stop 10 minutes after take off because you forgot to get a tank of gas. If you're early to the meeting spot, always double check with riders as they show up to make sure they remembered gas.

MONEY
Always bring both cash and plastic. Sometimes a venue (restaurant, gas station, etc) may not accept checks, or plastic. Then again, you might need to spend more money than you have (that's where the plastic comes into play). You don't want to be that person that has to borrow money for one reason or another.

FREEWAYS
Riding down the freeway as a group is not always an easy task.
PICK A LANE: The group leader should pick the best and safest lane available. Often, this will be the left-most lane available. Traffic can use other lanes to pass, and there is no merging traffic into your lane.
STAY IN YOUR LANE: Don't be a rebel and ride in a lane different from the rest of the group. This can confuse other riders as to where to go, or what lane to be in. Other lanes should be used by any riders doing photography (by a 2up rider or video recorder), group leaders, co-leaders, and sweepers. If you're just along for the ride, stay with the group, stay in your lane.

CHANGING LANES
When you change lanes, use common sense! When in a group, a lot of people can be affected by your actions. Use your blinkers, and always try to use an arm or extended leg in addition to your blinkers to notify the other riders around you that you're changing lanes.

Also, if you see a biker ahead of you notifying the group of a change in direction, or turn, duplicate that action to notify bikers behind you what the group will be doing. For example, if the lead rider is going to be taking a left turn, turns on his blinker, and extends his left arm: do the same, even if you're the last rider.

TWISTIES
When coming up on twists and turns, the formation of the group should switch from staggered riding to single file. Riders should communicate this by motioning "single file" (if you do not know how to motion this, ask at the next group ride), and proceed to enter a single file formation.

If you're a slower rider, keep yourself at the end of the group. If you're a faster rider, stay towards the front of the group. Do not ride above your skill level! If you have to take each twist and turn very slowly, DO SO. The group will wait for you at a designated spot ahead, at the next stoplight, stopsign, or change in the route?s direction. No rider gets left behind!

HAND SIGNALS
You should learn the basic hand signals riders use while on the open road. If you don't know what one of the signals mean, don't be afraid to ask!
COP: Tap your hand on the top of your helmet signals there is a cop in the area.
ROAD HAZARD: Pointing to the ground repeatedly will let other riders know there is a road hazard (sand, gravel, road kill, etc) up ahead (generally on the side the person is pointing).
LEFT TURN: Extend your left arm out parallel with the ground, and point.
RIGHT TURN: Extend your left arm, bent 90 degrees at the elbow
SLOW DOWN/STOP: Extend your left arm out parallel with the ground, with an open hand, and move it up and down.
BLINKER: Flashing five fingers at a rider will let them know they forgot to turn their blinker off.
CHANGE LANES: Extend your left or right foot signifying you?ll be changing lanes in that direction. Use this WITH a blinker.
GAS: Point to your has tank.
FOOD/DRINK: Point to your stomach.

STUNTING
If you want to stunt, talk to the person who organized the group ride to see if it's okay to stunt with the group. If you stunt, always do it in a lane that does not have any riders in it. Do it far ahead, or far behind the group -- not in the middle.

BRAKING
If you brake, try to "flash" your brake lights by tapping the brake quickly three to six times. This will help alert the riders behind you that you are stopping. If you see riders ahead braking, do not be afraid to flash your brakes a couple times before you actually start slowing down as a preemptive heads up.

GEAR
Wear gear! Always wear a helmet. Always try to ride with a riding jacket, gloves, jeans, and boots as a minimum.

ACCIDENTS
If there is an accident, have one designated person call 911.
When talking to 911, STAY CALM. Breath. Be efficient. Answer the questions they ask you, do not ramble.
Do not move the rider unless it is absolutely necessary (ie: face down in a puddle).
Do not remove the riders helmet, unless you must perform CPR.
Perform CPR if necessary. If you do not know CPR, learn (by getting certified).
Keep the neck protected without touching or moving the rider.
Do not remove anything that may be impaled in the rider (ie: branch, piece of metal, etc).
Get the other riders to a safe place, off the road.
Have riders & bikes slow down/direct traffic, ONLY IF NECESSARY.
Find out where the rider will be taken (which hospital)
The group leader (or a designated rider appointed by the group leader) should be the only person to talk to the police. The police do not need to hear the same story 50 different times by 20 different people.

SWEEPERS
Be aware of sweepers! Sweepers (Rolling Blockades) will pull off to the sides of an intersection, and park the bike. After the group had cleared the intersection, the sweepers will rejoin the group. Sometimes, the sweepers will need to head to the front of the pack, so be aware of passing bikes. There are two types of sweepers.
1) The Last Man: This type of sweeper is the designated "last man". This rider will be the last bike in the group, and never be ahead of any other rider in the group. When stopping at stop signs, stop lights, or a change in the routes direction the group leader will often wait for a "thumbs up" from the last man signifying that everyone in the group is accounted for. If there is an accident, they will call ahead and notify the group leader, call or help, or whatever else they must do given the situation.

2) Rolling Blockades: These sweepers can really make things easy for a large group. They will enter an intersection and block oncoming and turning traffic to allow the entire group to make it through the intersection together, safely. Sometimes, they will act as sweepers on the free-way slowing down cars in a lane of traffic to allow the group to change lanes safely. The police do not like these sweepers, and can technically issue tickets for "disrupting the flow of traffic" to sweepers. Bikes can also get tickets for running red lights, not stopping at a stop sign, etc.

About the diagram: This is an example of a left-hand turn. If a group decides to use the rolling Blockades, there is often two or three bikes used, covering the spots marked in red. The path of the group is marked in blue.

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#2 User is offline   Kerns BBO Icon

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Posted 16 August 2006 - 11:09 AM

And dont double up on me unless I know you and you know that it is ok. My friends are always welcome to double up with me because I trust certain people and can predict what they will do (to and extent). Even on the freeway I hate it when a new rider doubles up in my lane. Guess what, I may have to swerve even on the freeway!!! Its not even that, I just dont trust YOU. Yes you. Passing me to fill a gap is ok though even if i dont know you.
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Posted 17 August 2006 - 09:04 AM

EDITED 08/17/2006 @ 10:00am
Added details about "sweepers"
Added diagram of "sweepers"
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Posted 17 August 2006 - 09:17 AM

Kerns BBO, on Aug 16 2006, 11:09 AM, said:

And dont double up on me unless I know you and you know that it is ok. My friends are always welcome to double up with me because I trust certain people and can predict what they will do (to and extent). Even on the freeway I hate it when a new rider doubles up in my lane. Guess what, I may have to swerve even on the freeway!!! Its not even that, I just dont trust YOU. Yes you. Passing me to fill a gap is ok though even if i dont know you.

No its because you SUCK!!!
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Posted 23 August 2006 - 02:35 PM

itzbjorn, on Aug 16 2006, 10:59 AM, said:

ACCIDENTS
If there is an accident, have one designated person call 911.
When talking to 911, STAY CALM. Breath. Be efficient. Answer the questions they ask you, do not ramble.
Do not move the rider unless it is absolutely necessary (ie: face down in a puddle).
Do not remove the riders helmet, unless you must perform CPR.
Perform CPR if necessary. If you do not know CPR, learn.
Keep the neck protected without touching or moving the rider.
Do not remove anything that may be impaled in the rider (ie: branch, piece of metal, etc).
Get the other riders to a safe place, off the road.
Have riders & bikes slow down/direct traffic, ONLY IF NECESSARY.
Find out where the rider will be taken (which hospital)
The group leader (or a designated rider appointed by the group leader) should be the only person to talk to the police. The police do not need to hear the same story 50 different times by 20 different people.

It all looks good bjorn. I would just be a little more careful about the medical attention you may be insinuating people be prepared to give. Basically after 911 has been called leave the victim where the lay unless there is immediate danger to them. I.E. Fire, "face down in a puddle". And MOST IMPORTANT don't do anything that you don't have training in. I.E. CPR, C Spine Stabilization. The best thing you can do for the downed rider is stay with them and tell them that they are going to be ok and that help is on the way. Then wait untill the paramedics arrive.

Just the two cents of someone with a little medical background. I know to most of you that is common sense but there is always someone who will try something they really don't know how to do. :nono:
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#6 User is offline   Madchild Icon

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 10:42 PM

DO NOT PERFORM CPR ON ANYONE UNLESS YOUR CERTIFIED

You won't want someone to file a lawsuit on you because you were not certified at the time of the accident.

Go out and become first responder or cpr certified.

One key thing. If are one of those mention above. You can't not leave the victim untill someone of higher level take over for you.
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Posted 23 August 2006 - 11:35 PM

Madchild, on Aug 23 2006, 11:42 PM, said:

You won't want someone to file a lawsuit on you because you were not certified at the time of the accident.

They can sue you either way. Great system.
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#8 User is offline   Thor Icon

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Posted 24 August 2006 - 12:00 AM

Madchild, on Aug 23 2006, 10:42 PM, said:

DO NOT PERFORM CPR ON ANYONE UNLESS YOUR CERTIFIED

You won't want someone to file a lawsuit on you because you were not certified at the time of the accident.

Go out and become first responder or cpr certified.

One key thing. If are one of those mention above. You can't not leave the victim untill someone of higher level take over for you.

I don't think you can get sued for rendering assistance, regardless of certification. Sitll not a bad idea to get certified.

604A.01 Good Samaritan Law.

Subdivision 1. Duty to assist. A person at the scene of an emergency who knows that another person is exposed to or has suffered grave physical harm shall, to the extent that the person can do so without danger or peril to self or others, give reasonable assistance to the exposed person. Reasonable assistance may include obtaining or attempting to obtain aid from law enforcement or medical personnel. A person who violates this subdivision is guilty of a petty misdemeanor.

Subd. 2. General immunity from liability. (a) A person who, without compensation or the expectation of compensation, renders emergency care, advice, or assistance at the scene of an emergency or during transit to a location where professional medical care can be rendered, is not liable for any civil damages as a result of acts or omissions by that person in rendering the emergency care, advice, or assistance, unless the person acts in a willful and wanton or reckless manner in providing the care, advice, or assistance. This subdivision does not apply to a person rendering emergency care, advice, or assistance during the course of regular employment, and receiving compensation or expecting to receive compensation for rendering the care, advice, or assistance...
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Posted 24 August 2006 - 06:20 PM

You can still be sued. That law only applies if the victim is unable to respond to you asking if you can help them.
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Posted 24 August 2006 - 07:02 PM

Bitch sued McDonalds for getting hot coffee. You can sue for anything!
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Posted 24 August 2006 - 09:59 PM

You can get sue no matter what, even with the certification, but with the certification you have a better defense in court v.s not having one.

If you help someone and injured them more than their current state without a certification and will get bend over hardcore. IMO thats why you see a lot of people not stopping to help out people who's been in accidents. There really isn't much the bystander can do to help, besides calling 911
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Posted 25 August 2006 - 08:06 AM

I really dont think you have to worry about getting sued. They made that law just for that reason. Wow I just bought a bike sunday and already im learning so much. I cant wait to go out for a group ride sometime! :party: :punk: :rock:
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Posted 25 August 2006 - 08:38 AM

EDITED 08/25/2006 @ 9:30am
Added section about "freeways"
Edited information on "accidents" (clarification on cpr)
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#14 User is offline   Physicker Icon

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Posted 04 September 2006 - 08:10 PM

Great information, It's interesting to compare between the general attitude here in California and your's in MN. The biggest thing that stuck out was Kerns BBO's post about not doubling up. I'm assumeing your refering to riding side by side rather than stagered. With CA allowing "Lane sharing" or "White Lining" most riders don't even notice when they are doubled VS. Staggered. The group tends to chage formation bassed on traffic conditions.

Just my, $.02.

Ride Safe...
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Posted 05 September 2006 - 10:31 AM

Physicker, on Sep 4 2006, 08:10 PM, said:

Great information, It's interesting to compare between the general attitude here in California and your's in MN.

I'd say a majority of the time riders will ride staggered formation, and drop to single file through twists and turns.
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