MNSBR: GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE - MNSBR

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GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE edited 08/25

#31 User is offline   RCKT GRL Icon

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 12:53 PM

View Postdani, on Apr 25 2008, 12:46 PM, said:

As a newb, would you suggest riding in a smaller group, (2, then 3, then 4...etc.) before jumping into these group rides? I'd love to join, but I have a feeling I'd be extremely nervous with so many people around. Suggestions for a newb?


Hey Dani! First off welcome to the site and you couldn't have picked a better first bike. :thumbup:

I would suggest that you find some experienced riders that can mentor you and show you the ropes before jumping into a big group ride. All of us at one time or another have been a noob on a bike and can relate to the anxiety of riding in a large group brings. By keeping it small and controlled, that is where you will find you gain experience and confidence. If you haven't already, take the MSF. You are also more than welcome to ride with me, however I may be a bit too far south. good luck!
-Denyse
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#32 User is offline   skell15 Icon

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Posted 25 April 2008 - 01:01 PM

Keep it small at the beginning, yes. You can spend more time worrying about yourself, not what others are doing, that way. RCKT GRL is right, try going out with a few experienced people and stay in your comfort zone. If I recall, last year there was even a group ride set up with the inexperienced riders in mind. Something slower paced. There's always a chance someone will set something like that up this year, too.
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#33 User is offline   dani Icon

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:39 AM

Thanks for the suggestions :)

If I'm riding with anyone, it's my fiance and he's been riding for years. All of our friends sold their bikes (lame, I know) so I'm going to need to ride with some other people somehow. A beginners ride would be a good idea, actually. And, Denyse, thanks for the encouragement on my bike. I'm sure I'll get some looks at some point (like, hey what a tool. She's on a 250...), but meh. I don't care. I'm just starting and I'd rather do it right than look like a moron running into a tree because I can't control my bike.
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#34 User is offline   Blazin Benji Icon

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 11:50 AM

My friends Kristen and niki are new to the sport and ride 250's as well.

All of us live on the north end, but I'm sure they would be up to riding with other beginners.

I'd be willing to take you guys out on some easy roads up on this end
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#35 User is offline   dani Icon

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 12:06 PM

View PostBlazin Benji, on Apr 26 2008, 12:50 PM, said:

My friends Kristen and niki are new to the sport and ride 250's as well.

All of us live on the north end, but I'm sure they would be up to riding with other beginners.

I'd be willing to take you guys out on some easy roads up on this end


My fiance is from Crapids and we both work on the north side, so we're up there often. I'll PM you if we're in the area :)
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#36 User is offline   Blazin Benji Icon

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 12:17 PM

sounds good!
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#37 User is offline   Slick620 Icon

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 02:24 PM

View Postdani, on Apr 26 2008, 12:39 PM, said:

...
I'm just starting and I'd rather do it right than look like a moron running into a tree because I can't control my bike.

:lolsmi: I had to watch that at least 5 times, and each time it only got funnier. If you'll excuse me, I'm going to go watch it again.

"Don't hit the parked car!" haha
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#38 G_SalamiWrangler_*

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Posted 16 May 2008 - 01:11 PM

Big Groups suck.

Motorbiking is best done with 2 to 4 riders.

Big Groups are for Harley type goofballs.
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Posted 04 February 2010 - 07:44 PM

if ur certified and u did everything by the book (can be hard to do) then ur protected by ur certify er, if ur not certified, the good Samaritan act will protect u, although this is MN, u might just lose anyways,
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#40 User is offline   xveganxcowboyx Icon

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 10:48 PM

It might be worth amending the original post in the accident/aid section. Newer CPR guidelines call for chest compressions only (no rescue breathing) in almost all situations. This means there is no good reason to remove the helmet unless there is some very obvious threat posed by it remaining on. Maybe I am just uncreative, but I can't think of any situations which would require another rider to remove a helmet in an accident situation. It should be left on.
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#41 User is offline   2fastforU Icon

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Posted 17 May 2010 - 11:16 PM

View Postxveganxcowboyx, on 17 May 2010 - 10:48 PM, said:

It might be worth amending the original post in the accident/aid section. Newer CPR guidelines call for chest compressions only (no rescue breathing) in almost all situations. This means there is no good reason to remove the helmet unless there is some very obvious threat posed by it remaining on. Maybe I am just uncreative, but I can't think of any situations which would require another rider to remove a helmet in an accident situation. It should be left on.


I don't want this to become a pissing match, but the "new" CPR guidelines haven't been released by AHA so I would still suggest 30/2 CPR, if you are comfortable with giving rescue breaths. I will be the first to admit that if it is a stranger and I don't have a pocket mask I am simply going to open the airway and perform chest compressions. If they are in certain types of cardiac arrest (Atrial/Ventrical Fibrillation), they need chest compressions and an AED (Automatic External Defibrillator) which will recognize a shockable rhythm vs a "no shock advised" for a pulse found, or asystole (flat line). As far as removing the helmet is concerned, that depends on the status of the patient. If they have a patent airway, leave it on. But, if they are having difficulty breathing, or are unconscious it can get tricky. If you don't have medical training I would say leave it on until an advanced care provider arrives on scene.
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#42 User is offline   ripperd Icon

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 10:47 AM

View Postxveganxcowboyx, on 17 May 2010 - 10:48 PM, said:

It might be worth amending the original post in the accident/aid section. Newer CPR guidelines call for chest compressions only (no rescue breathing) in almost all situations. This means there is no good reason to remove the helmet unless there is some very obvious threat posed by it remaining on. Maybe I am just uncreative, but I can't think of any situations which would require another rider to remove a helmet in an accident situation. It should be left on.


People that are up on their first responder training should be up on this. Random people trying to perform CPR probably won't do it right...
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#43 User is offline   xveganxcowboyx Icon

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Posted 18 May 2010 - 01:01 PM

View Post2fastforU, on 17 May 2010 - 11:16 PM, said:

If you don't have medical training I would say leave it on until an advanced care provider arrives on scene.


View Postripperd, on 18 May 2010 - 10:47 AM, said:

People that are up on their first responder training should be up on this. Random people trying to perform CPR probably won't do it right...



I was mostly making this statement for those with limited or no medical training. There are many situations where I would still choose to perform rescue breaths, but I am an EMT and can distinguish between situations that do and do not call for assisted breathing. CPR has moved away from breathing and towards compressions over the years. 15/2, 30/2, now moving towards compression only. Survival rates have gone up. Part of this is prioritizing circulation, but part of it is simplifying the process for laypeople. Most people are hesitant and unsure of themselves in these situations and the simpler the procedures the better. (the same reason EMTs get ABCs drilled in to out heads, it's simple and covers the bases pretty well). My thinking for the wording in the original post was the same, keep it simple for people who may find themselves in these situations by eliminating the "do I have to remove the helmet for CPR?" question they may have. Definitely not trying to get in to a pissing contest. I see merits to both methods, was just thinking "who is my audience" when dispensing medical advice.

I think we can agree to simply say that unless you have specific training that tells you to remove the helmet in a situation, leave it on.
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#44 User is offline   husmn08 Icon

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 04:59 PM

View PostBear, on 16 August 2006 - 10:59 AM, said:

GROUP RIDE RULES & ETIQUETTE
Compiled & reconstructed by Bear

ON TIME
Show up early! If the group plans to meet at 2:00pm, plan to be there by 1:50pm. Besides, it will give you a chance to talk and b.s. with other riders.

GAS
Always get a full tank of gas before you show up for the group ride. The group will not appreciate having to stop 10 minutes after take off because you forgot to get a tank of gas. If you're early to the meeting spot, always double check with riders as they show up to make sure they remembered gas.

MONEY
Always bring both cash and plastic. Sometimes a venue (restaurant, gas station, etc) may not accept checks, or plastic. Then again, you might need to spend more money than you have (that's where the plastic comes into play). You don't want to be that person that has to borrow money for one reason or another.

FREEWAYS
Riding down the freeway as a group is not always an easy task.
PICK A LANE: The group leader should pick the best and safest lane available. Often, this will be the left-most lane available. Traffic can use other lanes to pass, and there is no merging traffic into your lane.
STAY IN YOUR LANE: Don't be a rebel and ride in a lane different from the rest of the group. This can confuse other riders as to where to go, or what lane to be in. Other lanes should be used by any riders doing photography (by a 2up rider or video recorder), group leaders, co-leaders, and sweepers. If you're just along for the ride, stay with the group, stay in your lane.

CHANGING LANES
When you change lanes, use common sense! When in a group, a lot of people can be affected by your actions. Use your blinkers, and always try to use an arm or extended leg in addition to your blinkers to notify the other riders around you that you're changing lanes.

Also, if you see a biker ahead of you notifying the group of a change in direction, or turn, duplicate that action to notify bikers behind you what the group will be doing. For example, if the lead rider is going to be taking a left turn, turns on his blinker, and extends his left arm: do the same, even if you're the last rider.

TWISTIES
When coming up on twists and turns, the formation of the group should switch from staggered riding to single file. Riders should communicate this by motioning "single file" (if you do not know how to motion this, ask at the next group ride), and proceed to enter a single file formation.

If you're a slower rider, keep yourself at the end of the group. If you're a faster rider, stay towards the front of the group. Do not ride above your skill level! If you have to take each twist and turn very slowly, DO SO. The group will wait for you at a designated spot ahead, at the next stoplight, stopsign, or change in the route?s direction. No rider gets left behind!

HAND SIGNALS
You should learn the basic hand signals riders use while on the open road. If you don't know what one of the signals mean, don't be afraid to ask!
COP: Tap your hand on the top of your helmet signals there is a cop in the area.
ROAD HAZARD: Pointing to the ground repeatedly will let other riders know there is a road hazard (sand, gravel, road kill, etc) up ahead (generally on the side the person is pointing).
LEFT TURN: Extend your left arm out parallel with the ground, and point.
RIGHT TURN: Extend your left arm, bent 90 degrees at the elbow
SLOW DOWN/STOP: Extend your left arm out parallel with the ground, with an open hand, and move it up and down.
BLINKER: Flashing five fingers at a rider will let them know they forgot to turn their blinker off.
CHANGE LANES: Extend your left or right foot signifying you?ll be changing lanes in that direction. Use this WITH a blinker.
GAS: Point to your has tank.
FOOD/DRINK: Point to your stomach.

STUNTING
If you want to stunt, talk to the person who organized the group ride to see if it's okay to stunt with the group. If you stunt, always do it in a lane that does not have any riders in it. Do it far ahead, or far behind the group -- not in the middle.

BRAKING
If you brake, try to "flash" your brake lights by tapping the brake quickly three to six times. This will help alert the riders behind you that you are stopping. If you see riders ahead braking, do not be afraid to flash your brakes a couple times before you actually start slowing down as a preemptive heads up.

GEAR
Wear gear! Always wear a helmet. Always try to ride with a riding jacket, gloves, jeans, and boots as a minimum.

ACCIDENTS
If there is an accident, have one designated person call 911.
When talking to 911, STAY CALM. Breath. Be efficient. Answer the questions they ask you, do not ramble.
Do not move the rider unless it is absolutely necessary (ie: face down in a puddle).
Do not remove the riders helmet, unless you must perform CPR.
Perform CPR if necessary. If you do not know CPR, learn (by getting certified).
Keep the neck protected without touching or moving the rider.
Do not remove anything that may be impaled in the rider (ie: branch, piece of metal, etc).
Get the other riders to a safe place, off the road.
Have riders & bikes slow down/direct traffic, ONLY IF NECESSARY.
Find out where the rider will be taken (which hospital)
The group leader (or a designated rider appointed by the group leader) should be the only person to talk to the police. The police do not need to hear the same story 50 different times by 20 different people.

SWEEPERS
Be aware of sweepers! Sweepers (Rolling Blockades) will pull off to the sides of an intersection, and park the bike. After the group had cleared the intersection, the sweepers will rejoin the group. Sometimes, the sweepers will need to head to the front of the pack, so be aware of passing bikes. There are two types of sweepers.
1) The Last Man: This type of sweeper is the designated "last man". This rider will be the last bike in the group, and never be ahead of any other rider in the group. When stopping at stop signs, stop lights, or a change in the routes direction the group leader will often wait for a "thumbs up" from the last man signifying that everyone in the group is accounted for. If there is an accident, they will call ahead and notify the group leader, call or help, or whatever else they must do given the situation.

2) Rolling Blockades: These sweepers can really make things easy for a large group. They will enter an intersection and block oncoming and turning traffic to allow the entire group to make it through the intersection together, safely. Sometimes, they will act as sweepers on the free-way slowing down cars in a lane of traffic to allow the group to change lanes safely. The police do not like these sweepers, and can technically issue tickets for "disrupting the flow of traffic" to sweepers. Bikes can also get tickets for running red lights, not stopping at a stop sign, etc.

About the diagram: This is an example of a left-hand turn. If a group decides to use the rolling Blockades, there is often two or three bikes used, covering the spots marked in red. The path of the group is marked in blue.



Here is one hand signal that was left out.


**I am Disappointed in Your Driving Abilities**

Sometimes when you are riding you will notice another driver making erratic or dangerous movements. Maybe they will be following you so closely they are clipping your license plate, or perhaps they merged into you almost forcing you off the road. In situations like this I tend to extend my left hand, bend it at the elbow, and raise my middle finger as an indicator of my displeasure.

Use caution when performing this hand signal because it often makes the recipient of it very angry.

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#45 User is offline   MNBikerPup Icon

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 05:02 PM

View Postwebcrawlr, on 23 August 2006 - 11:35 PM, said:

They can sue you either way. Great system.


Correction, they CAN NOT sue you if you are rendering aid. It's called the "Good Samaritan Law". Always best to use your judgement though, and always remember to suspect a neck injury, even if the vic is up and walking around. (I am EMT trained and experienced)
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