MNSBR: Sam's motorcycle winter storage procedure - MNSBR

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Sam's motorcycle winter storage procedure What I do & why

#31 User is offline   Popeye Icon

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 09:14 AM

View PostCrash Inc., on Oct 23 2006, 08:10 PM, said:

So, with lead gas, no Ethanol is added, and I like to keep the tank topped off -- would stabilizer still be necessary?

Leaded gas has nothing to do with oxygenated gas. The lead additive was used in older vehicles to lubricate valve guides and seats when they were using softer metals for those parts. Modern vehicles use harder materials, and the lead is unnecessary; removing it (getting the lead out, Mac) removes a significant source of environmental pollution.

Unleaded gas can be oxygenated (with ethanol) or non-oxygenated (straight gasoline). Ethanol is added to gas to try to reduce other pollutants caused by burning gasoline. It is now a federal crime to run non-oxygenated gas in a modern automobile. However, it is allowed for utility engines (lawnmowers, snowblowers, etc.), classic cars, and motorcycles. Stop by a Shell station and fill your bike and gas cans with their V-Power non-oxy gas. My Duc loves the stuff, and when winterizing it will avoid having any moisture absorbed by the non-existent ethanol.

However, Sta-Bil is still a must - gasoline does get "stale" over time, as the more volatile elements change or escape. So, put Sta-Bil in your V-Power-filled tank.
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#32 User is offline   Bear Icon

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:30 AM

View PostPopeye, on Oct 25 2006, 10:14 AM, said:

Leaded gas has nothing to do with oxygenated gas ... So, put Sta-Bil in your V-Power-filled tank.


Good information :thumbup:

Out of curiousity, what's the price difference and octane rating between the v-power and regular gas?



Also, Sam, good work! This post helps me a lot, thank you for taking the time to write it up!
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#33 User is offline   Popeye Icon

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Posted 25 October 2006 - 10:42 AM

The V-Power is standard premium gas - 92 or 93 octane. It's maybe 2-3 cents more per gallon than ethanol premium.

I'm thinking that most of you folks on the board are too young to remember that non-ethanol gas was the norm for many, many years. You probably think that "gasohol" has always been around. Au contraire...
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Posted 25 October 2006 - 12:15 PM

I admit that sometimes I'm an idiot, but I have another question. Correct me if I'm wrong, but you're saying that the shell V-Power is non-ethonal/non-oxy gas, which is a federal crime to run in a modern automobile.

But Shell sells it as their premium gas, right next to your standard 89 and 87? So are some people commiting crimes by filling their brand new BMW with it?

Sorry for the threadjack, but this information has peaked my interest.
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Posted 25 October 2006 - 12:23 PM

I don't know that the V-Power stuff is the only premium gas Shell sells. My 300M takes mid-grade or less, so I don't usually go looking for premium, and I try to stick with the V-Power for the bikes. The V-Power has a very distinctive hose to set it apart, and there's a sign stating the federal restrictions on each V-Power pump right next to the hose. It would be very stupid for Shell to knowingly market a non-oxy fuel as their primary (or only) premium gas.
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Posted 25 October 2006 - 12:53 PM

Cool, thanks for the info.
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#37 User is offline   Madchild Icon

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 12:34 AM

Sam what do you think about Sea Foam?



I never change my oil before storage. I suppose it can't be a good thing. I do everything else for storage.
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#38 User is offline   Sam Farris Icon

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 06:42 AM

View PostMadchild, on Nov 15 2006, 12:34 AM, said:

Sam what do you think about Sea Foam?
I never change my oil before storage. I suppose it can't be a good thing. I do everything else for storage.


I have used sea foam as an internal 'engine cleaner' and it seemed to do the job. I have never used it as a fuel stabilizer. I have heard nothing but good about this product.

Sam
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Posted 17 November 2006 - 03:07 PM

I just ride all year round. December, January, February...they all get at least about 15+ days. It keeps both me and my bike happy. :-D
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#40 User is offline   Crash Inc. Icon

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Posted 17 November 2006 - 06:57 PM

The only reason that I run lead-gas now is that you can't find 100+ Octane gas (with few exceptions, and at rediculous cost) without lead...

I'd LOVE to run 102 Octane no lead, but, at 7.00 a gallon for it, vs. 3.90 a gallon for 'regular' (remember when 110 was premium, 107 was midgrade and 102 was 'regular' ??? And then, they started phasing in 100 'high octane' no-lead, and it's been downhill ever since...)
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Posted 18 November 2006 - 10:11 PM

i put stabil in both bikes, and then drove one on a nice day until i had to re fill up and not re-stabilize the gas.

then i took the batteries out and keep em in my bedroom, ill charge em a couple times this winter

thats all i do
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Posted 10 October 2007 - 03:02 PM

Bump for a winter that seems to be approaching way too fast!
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Posted 10 October 2007 - 05:44 PM

I put mine on stands and put it in the corner of the garage and turn the key off.. Thats all i'v ever done, never had any troubles.

[Edit].. I just relized i commented on this last year.. LOL :bitchslap:
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#44 User is offline   Krautwagen Icon

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 10:03 PM

Awesome post Sam! Thanks for taking the time to do that.


Just a couple of points:
-ALWAYS apply anti-seize to spark plug threads!!! True, most of the time you may not need it, but, when it's there, it makes removal & installation MUCH easier, and greatly increases the accuracy of applied tightening torque. And, greatly reduces the chances of pulling the threads out of the head, which I've had happen on a few GM's. If you do not get any inside the combustion chamber, there is no possible harm that can come of it - only good. (getting anti-seize in the combustion chamber can toast O2 sensors, if you have em).

-Running the bike... worst thing you can do is to run the bike for 10min or less. This will create massive amounts of condensation in the crankcase, turning your oil into a nice frothy yellowish sludge that causes lots of corrosion (look at the oil in your car if you only use it for short trips ;) ). But, if you do run it for 20+ minutes, it will 're-lube' the top end, cylinders, and oil galleys throughout the engine, warm up the battery, and purge the fuel in the lines, pump/petcock & injectors/carbs, keeping it from 'varnishing'. Letting the bike stay running at operating temp will cause the moisture in the crankcase to evaporate, eliminating the problem I first eluded to. Key here is allowing the temperature to stabilize and an equilibrium to be reached. I wouldn't worry too much about 'acidic' oil causing problems, not sure I've ever seen an issue arise due to it.

EDIT - goddamit! I just realized this thread is a year old :angry: I hate it when I do that.
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#45 User is offline   The James Icon

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Posted 10 October 2007 - 10:12 PM

View PostKrautwagen, on Oct 10 2007, 11:03 PM, said:

greatly increases the accuracy of applied tightening torque.


I'm pretty sure that most torque specs are based on clean, unlubricated threads. This includes anti-seize.

I'm not arguing the point of putting it on, I have put it on every set of spark plugs on every vehicle that I have owned.

I think most people will encounter problems when it comes time to decide how much is enough. You just need a thin coating, in case anyone was wondering. Very thin.
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